Why an Indian hero’s statue was unveiled in Pakistan

‘In Pakistan there has been no problem about the installation of the statues of these men, unlike the Jinnah portrait or other controversies that seem to be present in India these days quite regularly,’A life-size sculpture of Maharaja Ranjit Singh, who ruled over Punjab for four decades, being unveiled on the eve of his 180th death anniversary, in Lahore on June 27, 2019.

The statue is located outside the Sikh gallery at Lahore Fort.’The nine feet tall statue, made of cold bronze, shows the regal Sikh emperor sitting on a horse, sword in hand, complete in Sikh attire.’

‘Sculpted by local artists, under the aegis of the Fakir Khana Museum, the statue is meant to invoke the feeling of the emperor being present, with its real life proportions, and was unveiled on his 180th death anniversary. Ranjt Singh passed away in 1839.’

‘The unveiling ceremony was highlighted by some daring gatka performances, or Sikh martial arts, where young boys displayed the different styles of attacking and sparring with various tools, including sticks that intend to simulate swords, a spiked ball and chain, and other weapons.’
‘The performances showed how a stealthily-trained warrior could manage to do the most daring feats, such as in the display of this skill, the stick or gatka wielding warrior easily broke earthen pots, and coconuts balanced on others’s heads, while two expert warriors sparred inside a circle of fire.’

In Pakistan there has been no problem about the installation of the statues of these men, unlike the Jinnah portrait or other controversies that seem to be present in India these days quite regularly.

As Indians we do not expect that our heroes are given any space in Pakistan, and that is why I say that these reports seem strange. But the fact is that Indians are mostly ignorant of Pakistan and our knowledge is second-hand and comes from a deranged Indian media.

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